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Greenpeace activists climb oil platform in Norway

4856eeb65d383b7535c9f9d17d4d1b06 - Greenpeace activists climb oil platform in Norway

Four activists of the environmental organization Greenpeace are Monday on an oil rig climbing in the north of Norway. Thus, they protested against the plans for an exploratory drilling to carry out in the Arctic region.

The platform, West Hercules was moored near Hammerfest, the most Northern town of the European continent. There it was prepared for booroperaties in the barents sea. ‘Drilling for oil in the arctic, while that area quicker than ever to melt, it is madness’, says Frode Pleym, head of Greenpeace Norway.

The Norwegian staatsenergiebedrijf Equinor promised in open water will drilling, far away from the ijsgrens in the barents sea. On that border, between the open sea and solid ice, would the cleanup of potential oil spills to be hard. “There is no universal technology for oil spills to clean up’, says mode erlend Tellnes, campaign manager for fossil fuels and Greenpeace Norway. “But if a leak is under the ice is, there is simply no way to reach it.’

Freely

Greenpeace held several protests against drilling in the waters of the arctic, but with little success. In 2016, won the environmental organisaie together with Natur og Ungdom (Nature and Freedom) even to the Norwegian state for the Supreme court. The occasion: the opening of a new zone to petroleum-mining – the first time in twenty years, still further away from the mainland and closer to the ijsgrens. According to Tellnes puts biodiversity under pressure: ‘a Lot of sea birds might, for example, their habitat losses.’

There were thirteen oil companies licences for the exploitation of the fossil fuel. According to Greenpeace, and Nature and Youth fell in breach of those licences the Norwegian law on the construction of oil drilling platforms. But the Supreme court failed to breach in black and white to get, so went the oliegiganten as well as freely.

Norway signed the agreement of Paris, but remains – after Russia – the largest European producer and exporter of natural gas and oil. Many environmentalists see the actions of the Norwegian state in 2016 as a violation of that agreement. Tellnes agrees: “In the agreement was that the global oil consumption by 2030 must be halved. Norway chooses to use it anyway to get to this pace by drilling up to 2070.’

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