Jewish community wroth to plan for worstenmuseum on site of former German concentration camp

The Jewish community in Germany is not to speak about plans to put on the site of a former German concentration camp in Thuringia-a worstenmuseum to build. In the camp were during the Second world War, prisoner held for them to the concentration camp Buchenwald were transferred.

"We are shocked and exasperated by so much lack of empathy," says Reinhard Schramm, spokesman of the Jewish community in Thuringia, where 800 Jews live. "We are in consultation with the city council. We hope to find a solution that is honourable for the many victims that have fallen.’

The idea of a worstenmuseum to build on the site of a former forced labor camp comes from the Friends of the Thuringian Sausage, an association which is already a museum operates, that is dedicated to the local delicacy. They came up with the idea to bring the current museum to move to the outskirts of the city of Mühlhausen, eighty kilometers northwest of the concentration camp Buchenwald.

A private investor bought the land in 2008 from the government, and developed plans to include a theater and a hotel building - and now also a worstenmuseum. But just on that spot stood during the Second world War, a camp where the nazis, about 700 women were holding captive who were forced in nearby factories to work. Other prisoners were directed to Buchenwald, where, between 1937 and 1945 280.000 people were trapped. More than fifty thousand of them survived that is not, by hunger, disease and medical experiments.

'Project re -'

The city council of Mühlhausen supported until recently the building on the site of the former forced labor camp. But Thursday organised a council at which representatives of the Jewish community were invited. The city council agreed, eventually, with a change of the zoning of the site. There was only one dissenting vote of a councillor who find that " the museum in the meat industry glorified’.

The spokesman of the Thuringian worstenmuseum did not respond to a request to comment on the plans, reports news agency Reuters. However, made it known that the new museum building ‘the capacity of the museum would expand, and the development of new attractions.’ On the site of the museum, meanwhile, is also the communication that the directors are not aware of was that the site during the Second world War a German concentration camp. ‘Against the background of the facts that have come to light, we will be the next days a full reassessment run the project’, as it sounds.

The Thuringian Sausage, made of pork, caraway, marjoram and garlic, is one of the most famous of the more than 1,500 varieties of sausage in Germany will be made.