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Images of train accident Buizingen in Netflix-movie: the mystery is solved

The producer of ‘Death Note’, the Netflix movie which aerial shots of the train accident in Buizingen emerged, the images in a correct manner purchased. They are by a Belgian cameraman. “It was an unfortunate combination of circumstances.’

Wim Robberechts is a bit generated by the hoopla over the aerial imagery that he two days after the train accident in Buizingen made. Robberechts is the owner of Wim Robberechts & Co., a small business …

Wim Robberechts is a bit generated by the hoopla over the aerial imagery that he two days after the train accident in Buizingen made. Robberechts is the owner of Wim Robberechts & Co., a company that specializes in aerial photography and video. “We often work in command,” says Robberechts, also for fiction projects. We have the aerial shots of the port of Antwerp, made for water, among others.’

Robberechts also presents his own ‘image library’, with aerial imagery which he, inter alia, through fotopersagentschap Photo News offers for sale. ‘That’s more than 2,000 clips with aerial imagery from Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Switzerland, ” says Robberechts. ‘Many of the generic city or landscape images, nowadays, especially film footage of melting glaciers and sea-based wind farms very much in demand. Tv stations buy that so in to specialized companies like that from me, that is for them cheaper than they shoot.’

‘Train’ + ‘accident’

The images of the train accident in Buizingen are a misfit in the collection of Robberechts. ‘On February 17, 2010, two days after the disaster, I was in the area for heli footage, and I’m going to have a look, with the idea that I might images could make that the news channels could use. I have those images everywhere, but only RTL has bought them and the day itself is still broadcast.’

But how come they’re in a horrofilm? “I have the images afterwards via an international agent on a beeldbanksite offered for sale, as I that with all of my aerial photos do. As a documentary filmmaker images of a melting glacier, then tap on that image library just ‘melting glacier’, and he buys a few seconds of my footage. As a film producer images of a train accident, then tap “train accident” on the same site, and he will immediately find yourself at the images I have in Buizingen have made. The producer has done nothing wrong: he has nicely paid. That data bank is not a news agency, so there is no restriction against any use in fiction.’

Not evil in the sense

Robberechts understand that people who are in the train accident were involved, by the images, shocked. “There are no victims, no one is identifiable, you only see a few firemen,” he says. ‘But anyway. Those images are an exception in my offer, I have never thought that they ever in such a context, would appear. I would certainly apologise to anyone who meant to hurt. I don’t want it from the image library to delete, but I’m going to try my agent to convince for the images of the restriction which they are only in the context of news reporting or documentaries about the train accident should be used. No longer fiction, so.’

“It’s just an unfortunate combination of circumstances,’ decision Robberechts. “No one had any evil in the sense. I after the reading of the reports in your newspaper immediately and also the NMBS will be contacted – a client of mine, by the way – to explain how the fork in the stalk.’

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